5 Must Read Books for Science Lovers! Yay!


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Hi there! I was thinking a lot about the title of this post and turned out I’m not very good in forming attractive titles, meh. However, there is nothing wrong with this title, it’s just that I don’t find this one very creative. So, keeping that aside, here is a post for you.

No no I’m not suggesting any book that will teach you about friction or about toppling effect and maybe you know that too. So, considering you are a curious person and you love to know things here are few suggestions for you. Chances are you might have already read these book that I’m discussing here, wonderful(I understand the geek that resides inside of you!), but there are also chances that you might have not read them yet. So, Now you should read them!Really.

There are whole lot of brilliant people out there, but there is one thing that separate one brilliant person from another. Like we always have that one professor who know everything but he can’t make you understand a shit (you getting me? I hope, or maybe I’m a fool). Likewise there are writers who know how to communicate with people, when you read their books you can literally feel the excitement with which they explain things with such simplicity. I love them, these people enjoy their work and are passionate (Now, you may be thinking when will she stop talking, okay I understand!).

“If I finish a book a week, I will read only a few thousand books in my lifetime, about a tenth of a percent of the contents of the greatest libraries of our time. The trick is to know which books to read.”

-Cosmos, Carl Sagan

Here is a list of those 5 books that I think you should read!


 

1. A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

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“There are three stages in scientific discovery. First, people deny that it is true, then they deny that it is important; finally they credit the wrong person.”

Description:

In Bryson’s biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understand and, if possible, answer the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the worlds most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps. He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds. A Short History of Nearly Everything is the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it. Science has never been more involving or entertaining.

why? This book will hold you in a tight grip and I’m telling you, you’ll get to know about a whole lot of things and then you may also find yourself talking about this book with people around you. And on top of that Bill Bryson is funny.


2. Pale Blue Dot : A Vision of the Human Future in Space by Carl Sagan

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“The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.”

Description:

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Carl Sagan traces our exploration of space and suggests that our very survival may depend on the wise use of other worlds. This stirring book reveals how scientific discovery has altered our perception of who we are and where we stand, and challenges us to weigh what we will do with that knowledge.

Now you may ask why? Book Review


3. Parallel Worlds: A Journey Through Creation, Higher Dimensions, and the Future of the Cosmos by Michio Kaku

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“Physicists are made of atoms. A physicist is an attempt by an atom to understand itself.”

Description:

In this thrilling journey into the mysteries of our cosmos, bestselling author Michio Kaku takes us on a dizzying ride to explore black holes and time machines, multidimensional space and, most tantalizing of all, the possibility that parallel universes may lay alongside our own. Kaku skillfully guides us through the latest innovations in string theory and its latest iteration, M-theory, which posits that our universe may be just one in an endless multiverse, a singular bubble floating in a sea of infinite bubble universes. If M-theory is proven correct, we may perhaps finally find answer to the question, “What happened before the big bang?” This is an exciting and unforgettable introduction into the new cutting-edge theories of physics and cosmology from one of the pre-eminent voices in the field.

why? If you are into time travel and again do I need to say? Parallel Universe! To tell you the truth I’m currently reading this book and I’m enjoying it and no it’s not a light read(you can guess that). However, a fun read.


 

4. Einstein’s Dream by Alan Lightman

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“The tragedy of this world is that no one is happy, whether stuck in a time of pain or of joy. The tragedy of this world is that everyone is alone. For a life in the past cannot be shared with the present. Each person who gets stuck in time gets stuck alone.”

Description:

A modern classic, Einstein’s Dreams is a fictional collage of stories dreamed by Albert Einstein in 1905, when he worked in a patent office in Switzerland. As the defiant but sensitive young genius is creating his theory of relativity, a new conception of time, he imagines many possible worlds. In one, time is circular, so that people are fated to repeat triumphs and failures over and over. In another, there is a place where time stands still, visited by lovers and parents clinging to their children. In another, time is a nightingale, sometimes trapped by a bell jar.

why? Book Review


5. Cosmos by Carl Sagan

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“we make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers”

Description:

Cosmos has 13 heavily illustrated chapters, corresponding to the 13 episodes of the Cosmos television series. In the book, Sagan explores 15 billion years of cosmic evolution and the development of science and civilization. Cosmos traces the origins of knowledge and the scientific method, mixing science and philosophy, and speculates to the future of science. The book also discusses the underlying premises of science by providing biographical anecdotes about many prominent scientists throughout history, placing their contributions into the broader context of the development of modern science.

The book covers a broad range of topics, comprising Sagan’s reflections on anthropological, cosmological, biological, historical, and astronomical matters from antiquity to contemporary times. Sagan reiterates his position on extraterrestrial life—that the magnitude of the universe permits the existence of thousands of alien civilizations, but no credible evidence exists to demonstrate that such life has ever visited earth.

why? Okay, I know I’m bit biased with Sagan, what can I do? He is my darling(yes yes). Well, let me tell you something if you are living on this planet then you need to read this book. There is no why to it. It is what it is!(I’ll write the review soon)


 

Now you may carry on with your day. Have a good day! 🙂

 

 

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2 thoughts on “5 Must Read Books for Science Lovers! Yay!

  1. I appreciate your list but I think, with the exception of Bryson, you have focused on the inspirational and speculative rather than the educational or historical. I would also recommend The Ghost Map by Steven Johnson or Big Bang by the underrated Simon Singh that enlighten some of the big breakthroughs of the past.

    Science, though, is increasingly under attack by those who insist on ‘other ways of knowing’, etc, so I think it is important to read books that explain what science is and what it isn’t and defend it from false accusations. That’s why, if I were to pick a Sagan, I would have to go with Demon Haunted World. For similar reasons The Blind Watchmaker by Dawkins is excellent, though my favourite science book, for purely enjoyment reasons, is his The Ancestor’s Tale.

    But there are a lot of good science books out there, the hard part is getting people to read more of them!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi!
      I really appreciate your comment. And yes I understand what you are trying to say here( guess why I was struggling so much with the title). But obviously I haven’t read all the books and yes now that you have mentioned few books, I’m surely gonna read them.

      And I also understand I might have missed other great books, but surely with time I’ll come across them and I’ll read them and speak about them. Like today you recommended me few books and I checked them out and now I’m gonna read them. Thanks for recommendations.

      And Thanks for stopping by!
      Enjoy you day!

      Liked by 1 person

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